Recipe For Health
by Corporate Chef Kurt Kwiatkowski
Featured Food: Plums Yield: Serves 4Learn more about Plums

Ingredients

  • 3 T. unseasoned rice vinegar
  • 1 T. fresh squeeze lime juice
  • 2 T. fish sauce
  • 1 T. honey
  • 3 firm red plums, cut into 1/2-inch chunks
  • ½ c. thinly sliced red onions
  • 1 Fresno chile pepper, thinly sliced, not seeded
  • ½ lb. rice noodles
  • ½ c. rough chopped cilantro
  • ½ c. rough chopped mint
  • ½ c. rough chopped Thai basil

Preparation

Mix the rice vinegar, lime juice, fish sauce, and honey together and then add the plums, onions, and pepper. Let marinate for minimum of 30 minutes.

Cook noodles according to package instructions, then shock them (plunge in ice water) to stop the cooking process.

Mix together the fresh herbs.

Toss the noodles with half the herb mixture then with the fruit/vinaigrette. Top with a generous amount of fresh herbs before serving. Pairs well with salmon (pictured), pork, or duck.

Learn More About Plums

Think of a plum and you probably envision a round purple fruit, yellow and juicy sweet on the inside. While that’s true for many varieties, plums are the most diverse of the stone fruits. Skin colors range from blue/purple to black, red, green, and yellow. Most have yellowish flesh while some are red inside. Their flavors range from sour to very sweet.

Plum varieties fit into 2 main types:

  • Japanese varieties are yellow or red but never purple. Their oval or round shapes come to a point at the blossom end. All have very juicy, fibrous flesh that is distinctly sour near the pit and peel. All are clingstone (fruit clings to the pit). Japanese plums are best eaten fresh and wonderful for baking into desserts.
  • European varieties are yellow, blue/purple, or black and covered with silvery bloom. Inside their oval shape is sweet and firm yellow flesh. Most are freestone (fruit separates easily from the pit). Great for eating fresh, cooking, or grilling. Their high sugar content and thick flesh make them perfect for drying (plum promoters prefer “dried plums” versus “prunes”).

All varieties, both Japanese and European, are grown in the United States. California leads the nation producing nearly 90 percent of US-grown plums each year. Michigan comes in at a distant 5th.

Wondering where your plums are from? The calendar is your best clue. In the supermarket Chilean plums appear from January through May, then they’re California plums from mid-May through October. Michigan plums come into season beginning mid-July and ending late September and are found mostly at farmers markets and farm stands.

Plums are ripe and ready to eat when they are fragrant and give to gentle pressure. Choose plums that look plump and feel firm but not hard. Softening can be speeded up by placing plums in a tightly closed paper bag on the countertop for a few days. When ripe, eat at once! They’ll also keep in the fridge for 3 days.

Peggy Crum MA, RD

Featured Recipes

Recipe For Health

Rhubarb & Strawberry Crisp

Combine tart rhubarb with sweet strawberries, add a streusel topping, and bake until bubbly. Dessert doesn’t get easier—or more classic—than this. Serve warm with a scoop of vanilla ice cream. You’re sure to get rave reviews!

Recipe For Health

Farro Salad with Grilled Vegetables

Chewy farro grains are delicious in this autumn-y salad. Recipe yields enough for dinner for 2 to 4 with some left for a couple of lunches. To do this, make the base with dressing, farro, and grilled veggies. Add fresh veggies to the base as you go.

Recipe For Health

Pecan and Dark Chocolate Chip Cookies

Roasting amps up the flavor in everything including pecans. Chef Kurt's attention to detail takes a traditional chocolate chip cookie to another level of yum!

Recipe For Health

Onion Soup

Onions, the simplest of pantry staples, mingle with butter, broth, and herbs to become luxuriously smooth and delicious. Add "homemade" croutons and a blend of cheeses to make a complete and satisfying meal.

More Food and Nutrition Recipes

Find a Recipe

Browse all recipes

Find a Class

Browse all courses

Search Health4U


Coaching and Counseling Services

Coaching and Counseling Services provides you with access to accurate health and lifestyle information, helping you to explore new behaviors and skills, and identifying useful campus and community resources.

MSU community members eligible for coaching and counseling services include faculty, staff, graduate assistants, retirees and the spouses/partners of members of these groups.

To schedule an appointment with Health4U you are not required to email us from your MSU email address; please email us from the email address you are most comfortable with. 

Read More

Departmental Services

The goal of department based services is to provide work units and colleagues the opportunity to learn about health and wellness as a group activity or exploration.  

Read More

Health e-Guide

This guide has been discontinued and is no longer viewable.

Visit Health e-Guide